Sunday Reading: The Challenge to Reproductive Rights in America

During the past few months, several states have passed increasingly restrictive laws dealing with women’s reproductive rights, including access to abortion. This week, we’ve gathered a selection of pieces about the steady erosion of these rights across the country. Charles Bethea reports on a standoff between anti-abortion protesters and clinic volunteers at the last abortion …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: The Power of Political Satire

Comedians and humorists today do more than simply comment upon politics; they help shape it. This week, we’re bringing you pieces about the sustained influence of satire on political life. In “How Jokes Won the Election,” Emily Nussbaum explores the effect of right-wing memes and political humor during the last Presidential campaign. Adrian Chen examines …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: Motherhood

Today, for Mother’s Day, we’re bringing you pieces about the lives of mothers and the ways in which mothers shape our lives. Jill Lepore reflects on her mother’s life and explains how it led her to write a book about Jane Franklin and Jane’s unique relationship with her brother Benjamin Franklin. In “Dear Life,” Alice …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: The Brain

In recent decades, we’ve grown more acquainted with the world inside our heads—a universe of neurons and synapses that, somehow, makes us who we are. This week, we’re bringing you pieces about mysteries and revelations of the brain. Oliver Sacks meets a woman who’s losing the ability to recognize familiar objects by sight, in “The …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: Literary Chronicles

“Dreamer and dredger, gerund purveyor and ultimate wordsmith, [Joyce] would lope his way home from the bar, dancing capriciously in his cups, reciting Verlaine, and yet be ready for the next day’s excruciating work, to embody the jokes, the smut, the ditties, the flotsam and jetsam of all that he had heard, so as to …

Continue reading

The Week Beyond Mueller and Trump

The Trump Presidency has been exhausting in any number of ways. It is an attention vortex that sometimes makes us lose sight of other matters that are just as deserving of our absorption. The release of the redacted Mueller report, this week, was yet another one of those maelstrom moments, in a Presidency full of …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: The Mueller Report

Following the release of the redacted report by the special counsel’s office, the political world remains divided. The President has declared himself completely and utterly vindicated in every respect. Meanwhile, Democrats (and many others) have cited multiple passages that confirm incidents that have every appearance of Presidential obstruction. If you’re spending the weekend curled up …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: Crimes of Passion

In 1859, Daniel Sickles, a congressman from New York, shot his wife’s lover—the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia and the son of Francis Scott Key—in Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House. Sickles invoked the defense of “temporary insanity”—he was the first American to do so—and, soon afterward, was acquitted by …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: Dystopian Fiction

Fifty years ago this week, Kurt Vonnegut published the dystopian classic “Slaughterhouse-Five.” With everything that’s going on in the world, it’s easy to feel as though we’re living in a dystopia from which there’s no escape. This weekend, we’re bringing you pieces about the scary, strange, magnetic appeal of dystopian fiction. Rebecca Mead profiles Margaret …

Continue reading

Sunday Reading: Legendary Heists

There’s something seductive about the idea of the perfect heist—a crime that’s both reckless and meticulous, requiring a detailed plan for breaking the rules. This week, we’ve gathered a selection of pieces on legendary heists and capers. In “The Pink Panthers,” David Samuels tracks a network of seasoned diamond thieves who have orchestrated spectacular heists …

Continue reading