Sunday Reading: Crimes of Passion

In 1859, Daniel Sickles, a congressman from New York, shot his wife’s lover—the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia and the son of Francis Scott Key—in Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House. Sickles invoked the defense of “temporary insanity”—he was the first American to do so—and, soon afterward, was acquitted by …

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Sunday Reading: Dystopian Fiction

Fifty years ago this week, Kurt Vonnegut published the dystopian classic “Slaughterhouse-Five.” With everything that’s going on in the world, it’s easy to feel as though we’re living in a dystopia from which there’s no escape. This weekend, we’re bringing you pieces about the scary, strange, magnetic appeal of dystopian fiction. Rebecca Mead profiles Margaret …

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Sunday Reading: Legendary Heists

There’s something seductive about the idea of the perfect heist—a crime that’s both reckless and meticulous, requiring a detailed plan for breaking the rules. This week, we’ve gathered a selection of pieces on legendary heists and capers. In “The Pink Panthers,” David Samuels tracks a network of seasoned diamond thieves who have orchestrated spectacular heists …

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Weekend Reading: The Challenges of Social Media

This weekend—after a horrific mass shooting in New Zealand was live-streamed on Facebook—we’re bringing you a selection of pieces about the ways in which social media is affecting our lives and our politics. In “Ghost in the Machine,” Evan Osnos investigates Facebook’s impact on the 2016 Presidential election and assesses the social network’s efforts to …

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